zombiepanic...

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authenticbougie:

arts-and-hearts:

ignoranthipster:

Disney gender swaps by Sakimi Chan

No sexy bear Ursula tho?

(Fuente: likeafireonpavement, vía robblerobble)

(Fuente: 70sscifiart, vía empiregrotesk)

(vía hectograph)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Stretchable Paper 3-D Sculptures by Li Hongbo

Li Hongbo’s stunning, stretchable, paper sculptures, inspired by both traditional folk art and his time as a student learning to sculpt, challenge our perceptions. With a technique influenced by his fascination with traditional Chinese decorations known as paper gourds—made from glued layers of paper—Li Hongbo applies a honeycomb-like structure to form remarkably flexible sculptures.

(vía asylum-art)

umbralnirvana:

Monongaia by Miles Toland

umbralnirvana:

Monongaia by Miles Toland

(Fuente: technohm, vía nevesnevele)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Expressive Illustrations That Tell Surreal Stories By  Christian Schloe on Facebook

These surreal scenes by Christian Schloe feature bizarre moments that draw viewers out of a concrete reality and into a dreamy, fictional world. In his work, the digital artist creates expressive visual stories filled with soft color palettes, elegant birds and butterflies, soft flower petals, and otherworldly, majestic landscapes. The illusion of a scratched canvas and worn, aged edges allude to a different time and place where a howling wolf is half human, half animal; a couple dances among the clouds; and a young girl collects drops of moonlight in a bowl.

(vía asylum-art)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

 Fantastical Portrait Photography by Kirsty Mitchell

Fashion Photography by Kirsty Mitchell. Born in 1976 and raised in the English county of Kent, Kirsty studied the history of art, photography, fine art in ‘Costume for Performance’ at the London College of Fashion and completed a first class degree in fashion design, at Ravensbourne College of Art in the summer of 2001.

(vía bribeofeternity)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Art of Face  Photography by Alexander Khokhlov

(Fuente: , vía asylum-art)

FlexDreams Photography For Lasmaker magazine

(Fuente: f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s, vía asylum-art)

 Oleg Oprisco photography

Kiev-based artistic photographer Oleg Oprisco beside simple magic applies some surreal practices to his works. Some of you in Saint-Petersburg can have a chance to study magician photography from him later this month, follow him on Livejournal, Flickr or 500px

(Fuente: f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s, vía asylum-art)

Anja Millen's deviantART Gallery

Strange Artistic Photo Manipulations & digital artworks by german artist Anja Millen.

(Fuente: f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s, vía asylum-art)

climateadaptation:

Remember this from last week? It’s supposed to be a sunrise projected due to high levels of pollution in China. Well, we’ve been duped. It’s an advertisement that plays year round, regardless time of day or pollution levels. From TechInAsia:

No, Beijing residents are NOT watching fake sunrises on giant TVs because of pollution
Over the weekend, a story that originated on the smut-ridden UK-based Daily Mail went viral among major media outlets across the world. Time, CBS, and the Huffington Post were among the dozens of online news media who published stories about Beijing residents flocking to giant TV screens to see fake sunrises during heavy pollution last week. Most of these stories were accompanied by the same photo of a massive TV screen in Tiananmen Square with a sunrise appearing on it.
In truth, that sunrise was on the screen for less than 10 seconds at a time, as it was part of an ad for tourism in China’s Shandong province. The ad plays every day throughout the day all year round no matter how bad the pollution is. … Look closely, and you can even see the Shandong tourism logo in the bottom right corner.

climateadaptation:

Remember this from last week? It’s supposed to be a sunrise projected due to high levels of pollution in China. Well, we’ve been duped. It’s an advertisement that plays year round, regardless time of day or pollution levels. From TechInAsia:

No, Beijing residents are NOT watching fake sunrises on giant TVs because of pollution

Over the weekend, a story that originated on the smut-ridden UK-based Daily Mail went viral among major media outlets across the world. TimeCBS, and the Huffington Post were among the dozens of online news media who published stories about Beijing residents flocking to giant TV screens to see fake sunrises during heavy pollution last week. Most of these stories were accompanied by the same photo of a massive TV screen in Tiananmen Square with a sunrise appearing on it.

In truth, that sunrise was on the screen for less than 10 seconds at a time, as it was part of an ad for tourism in China’s Shandong province. The ad plays every day throughout the day all year round no matter how bad the pollution is. … Look closely, and you can even see the Shandong tourism logo in the bottom right corner.